The App You’ve Never Heard of That’s Making Your City Better

In the 80s and 90s, the 911 system in the US became overloaded with people calling to report things like wayward couches and double-parked cars—not emergencies, yet situations where city officials could help. In 1996, Baltimore successfully tested a system that diverted these requests to a separate number. In 1997, the FCC reserved “311” as a dedicated non-emergency number for US residents nationwide.

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via Gizmodo http://bit.ly/29HPyJC

Meteorologists Need to Start Talking About Climate Change

Last week, after raging for two months over an area the size of Delaware, the Fort McMurray fire was finally declared “under control.” This was the costliest fire in Canadian history, forcing the relocation of 90,000 people—the largest evacuation in Alberta’s history—and over $2.9 billion in losses. Although the fire is finally manageable, parts of the forest will likely burn for another year. Think about that: an entire year.

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Riders of SF’s Tech Buses Would Prefer To Keep Their Commutes as Cushy as Possible

San Francisco needs help. It also needs to decide where to put bus stops for the hundreds of shuttle buses that creep through its streets, gathering wizened, under-caffeinated developers for their journeys to jolly Mountain View. A survey that asked for such logistical input provided some additional—and perhaps unsolicited—insight into these private transit experiences.

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via Gizmodo http://bit.ly/29oWTfE

Greenland Is Building the Perfect Place to Watch the World End

A stunning structure built 150 miles inside the Arctic Circle will serve as a crucial research center for glaciologists. But perhaps more importantly, it will be a place where humans can travel to see the real-time impact of climate change.

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via Gizmodo http://bit.ly/29rClE0

NYC’s Elegant Storm-Proofing Proposal Will Probably End Up Being a ‘Big Dumb Wall’

In 2014, New York City funded a proposal called the “Big U
,” a 10-mile barrier around Lower Manhattan to prevent the devastating effects of both storm surges and sea-level rise. The biggest strength of the $540 million project was that the infrastructure would do double-duty by adding parks and public space around the perimeter of the island. But due to cost issues, those plans might not happen at all, according to a story in Rolling Stone.

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Hyperloop Connecting Helsinki and Stockholm Turns 300-Mile Trip Into 28 Minute Ride

Where will the first Hyperloop be? So far there are plans to use the tubular transportation system to move passengers in Slovakia
and freight in Switzerland
. But a proposed application for the Hyperloop announced today could solve a transportation conundrum that has been challenging planners for centuries: Connecting the neighboring nations of Sweden and Finland.

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via Gizmodo http://bit.ly/29kCqd9