Nature

New on 500px : The Jewel Box ( NGC 4755 ) by Mike O’Day ( 500px.com/mikeoday ) by MikeODay by MikeODay

The Jewel Box Cluster in the Crux Constellation ( NGC 4755 ) by Mike O’Day ( 500px.com/MikeODay )

Viewed through a telsecope, John Herschel described the Jewel Box Cluster as “a casket of varioulsy coloured precious stones” – hence the name. The Jewel Box, visible only from the Southern Hemisphere and appearing as a bright fuzzy star to the naked eye, is a cluster of around 100 ( mostly blue giant ) stars approximately 7000 light years from Earth.

Links:

500px.com/MikeODay
http://bit.ly/1VGHLeU

Details:

NGC 4755 – RA 12h 54.5m, Dec -60deg 26′.
Skywatcher Quattro 10″ f4 Newtonian.
Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount.
Unguided.
Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector.
Nikon D300 (unmodified).
Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90.
Combination of 15 images 30 sec @ ISO800.

Registax & Photoshop
24 April 2014 (re-processed Nov 2015) via Tumblr http://bit.ly/1O0P4sx

Nature

New on 500px : hyades by DeSelby by DeSelby

“In Greek mythology, the Hyades were the five daughters of Atlas and half-sisters to the Pleiades. After the death of their brother, Hyas, the weeping sisters were transformed into a cluster of stars that was afterwards associated with rain.

As a naked-eye object, the Hyades cluster has been known since prehistoric times. It is mentioned by numerous Classical authors from Homer to Ovid.

In Book 18 of the Iliad the stars of the Hyades appear along with the Pleiades, Ursa Major, and Orion on the shield that the god Hephaistos made for Achilles.

In England the cluster was known as the “April Rainers” from an association with April showers, as recorded in the folk song “Green Grow the Rushes, O”.

The cluster was probably first catalogued by Giovanni Batista Hodierna in 1654, and it subsequently appeared in many star atlases of the 17th and 18th centuries.[13] However, Charles Messier did not include the Hyades in his 1781 catalog of deep sky objects.

It therefore lacks a Messier number, unlike many other, more distant open clusters โ€“ e.g., M44 (Praesepe), M45 (Pleiades), and M67.

In 1869, the astronomer R.A. Proctor observed that numerous stars at large distances from the Hyades share a similar motion through space.
In 1908, Lewis Boss reported almost 25 years of observations to support this premise, arguing for the existence of a co-moving group of stars that he called the Taurus Stream (now generally known as the Hyades Stream or Hyades Supercluster). Boss published a chart that traced the scattered stars’ movements back to a common point of convergence.”*

*wikipedia via Tumblr http://ift.tt/1OlchVl

Nature

New on 500px : the shining of things by DeSelby by DeSelby

first part of my new orion-project –
a collection of 90min of starlight ๐Ÿ˜‰

best on black!!

editing inspiration:
david sylvian “the shining of things” via Tumblr http://bit.ly/1Rwz3iW

Nature

New on 500px : orion complex by DeSelby by DeSelby

“The Orion Molecular Cloud Complex (or, simply, the Orion Complex) is a large group of bright nebulae, dark clouds, and young stars in the Orion constellation. The cloud is between 1 500 and 1 600 light-years away, and hundreds of light-years across. Several parts of the nebula can be observed through binoculars and small telescopes, and some parts (such as the Orion Nebula) are visible to the naked eye.

The nebula is important because of its sheer size, as it spreads several degrees from Orion’s Belt to his sword. It is also one of the most active regions of stellar formation visible in the night sky, and is home to both protoplanetary discs and very young stars. The nebula is bright in infrared wavelengths due to the heat-intensive processes involved in the stellar formation, though the complex contains dark nebulae, emission nebulae, reflection nebulae, and H II regions.
The Horsehead Nebula (also known as Barnard 33 ) is a dark nebula in the constellation Orion.
The nebula is located just to the south of the star Alnitak, which is farthest east on Orion’s Belt, and is part of the much larger Orion Molecular Cloud Complex. The nebula was first recorded in 1888 by Scottish astronomer Williamina Fleming on photographic plate B2312 taken at the Harvard College Observatory. The Horsehead Nebula is approximately 1500 light years from Earth. It is one of the most identifiable nebulae because of the shape of its swirling cloud of dark dust and gases, which bears some resemblance to a horse’s head when viewed from Earth.

Barnard’s Loop (catalogue designation Sh 2-276) is an emission nebula in the constellation of Orion. It is part of the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex which also contains the dark Horsehead and bright Orion nebulae. The loop takes the form of a large arc centred approximately on the Orion Nebula. The stars within the Orion Nebula are believed to be responsible for ionizing the loop.

The loop extends over about 600 arcminutes as seen from Earth, covering much of Orion. It is well seen in long-exposure photographs, although observers under very dark skies may be able to see it with the naked eye.

Recent estimates place it at a distance of either 159 pc (518 light years) or 440 pc (1434 ly) giving it dimensions of either about 100 or 300 ly across respectively. It is thought to have originated in a supernova explosion about 2 million years ago, which may have also created several known runaway stars, including AE Aurigae, Mu Columbae and 53 Arietis, which are believed to have been part of a multiple star system in which one component exploded as a supernova.

Although this faint nebula was certainly observed by earlier astronomers, it is named after the pioneering astrophotographer E. E. Barnard who photographed it and published a description in 1894.”

(wikipedia)

editing inspiration:
pixinsight tutorials ๐Ÿ˜‰ via Tumblr http://ift.tt/1lQNMsT

Nature

New on 500px : lost in the stars by DeSelby by DeSelby

“Interstellar clouds like the Orion Nebula are found throughout galaxies such as the Milky Way. They begin as gravitationally bound blobs of cold, neutral hydrogen, intermixed with traces of other elements. The cloud can contain hundreds of thousands of solar masses and extend for hundreds of light years. The tiny force of gravity that could compel the cloud to collapse is counterbalanced by the very faint pressure of the gas in the cloud.

Whether due to collisions with a spiral arm, or through the shock wave emitted from supernovae, the atoms are precipitated into heavier molecules and the result is a molecular cloud. This presages the formation of stars within the cloud, usually thought to be within a period of 10-30 million years, as regions pass the Jeans mass and the destabilized volumes collapse into disks. The disk concentrates at the core to form a star, which may be surrounded by a protoplanetary disk. This is the current stage of evolution of the nebula, with additional stars still forming from the collapsing molecular cloud. The youngest and brightest stars we now see in the Orion Nebula are thought to be less than 300,000 years old, and the brightest may be only 10,000 years in age.

Some of these collapsing stars can be particularly massive, and can emit large quantities of ionizing ultraviolet radiation. An example of this is seen with the Trapezium cluster. Over time the ultraviolet light from the massive stars at the center of the nebula will push away the surrounding gas and dust in a process called photo evaporation. This process is responsible for creating the interior cavity of the nebula, allowing the stars at the core to be viewed from Earth.[8] The largest of these stars have short life spans and will evolve to become supernovae.

Within about 100,000 years, most of the gas and dust will be ejected. The remains will form a young open cluster, a cluster of bright, young stars surrounded by wispy filaments from the former cloud.
The Pleiades is a famous example of such a cluster.”*

*wikipedia

editing inspiration:
nils landgren
“the moon, the stars and you” via Tumblr http://ift.tt/1N090Kp

Nature

New on 500px : cradles by DeSelby by DeSelby

WOW !! – 7000 followersโ€ฆ thank you ALL for your appreciation, here i’ve got a present for you – hope, you like it ๐Ÿ˜‰

“The Lagoon Nebula (catalogued as Messier 8 or M8, and as NGC 6523) is a giant interstellar cloud in the constellation Sagittarius. It is classified as an emission nebula and as a H II region.

The Lagoon Nebula was discovered by Giovanni Hodierna before 1654 and is one of only two star-forming nebulae faintly visible to the naked eye from mid-northern latitudes. Seen with binoculars, it appears as a distinct oval cloudlike patch with a definite core. In the foreground is the open cluster NGC 6530.
The Trifid Nebula (catalogued as Messier 20 or M20 and as NGC 6514) is an H II region located in Sagittarius. It was discovered by Charles Messier on June 5, 1764. Its name means ‘divided into three lobes’. The object is an unusual combination of an open cluster of stars; an emission nebula (the lower, red portion), a reflection nebula (the upper, blue portion) and a dark nebula (the apparent ‘gaps’ within the emission nebula that cause the trifurcated appearance; these are also designated Barnard 85). Viewed through a small telescope, the Trifid Nebula is a bright and peculiar object, and is thus a perennial favorite of amateur astronomers.

The Trifid Nebula is a star-forming region in the Scutum spiral arm of the Milky Way.
The most massive star that has formed in this region is HD 164492A, an O7.5III star with a mass more than 20 times the mass of the Sun. This star is surrounded by a cluster of approximately 3100 young stars.”*

*from “wikipedia” via Tumblr http://ift.tt/1KMaDds